Does It Makes Sense To Buy A New House Before Selling The Old One?

Does It Makes Sense To Buy A New House Before Selling The Old One?

Does It Makes Sense To Buy A New House Before Selling The Old One?

You’re interested in moving. You need to sell your old house first before buying a new one, right? After all, you don’t have enough of a down payment for the new house without selling the old one, and you are pretty certain your bank will not qualify you for two mortgages.

You are in a dilemma; houses in your area are currently receiving multiple offers. Inventory is low. Sure, you can sell your house under the same circumstances, but will you be able to identify a new house so that you can simultaneously move from the old house to the new one? Unlikely. Do you sell the current house, move to a rental [or hotel) while you identify and try and close on the new house? Is the extra hassle of moving twice and the added stress of the inability to simultaneously close on the sale and purchase the new worth it? IF you could purchase a new house while still living in the old house, is it worth the added costs involved with having a second mortgage until you sell the old house? How much is “peace of mind” worth in not having the pressure of having to purchase a new house (because you sold the old house too soon)?

These questions are a reality in today’s world in many parts of the country, specifically, the San Francisco Bay Area, because of the real estate rebound after the Great Recession. According to Jeff Stricker, a real estate professional with Alain Pinel Realtors specializing in the Silicon Valley in California, his clients are faced with these exact situations much of the time, as property is swooped up almost as soon as it hits the market, and, many times, with multiple, over asking prices. Jeff states that, although it is great for his clients as sellers, those same clients face challenging hurdles when buying a replacement property; competing against other buyers, some with cash only offers, who are willing to bid up a property far beyond the asking price in many circumstances. Some buyers are just so frustrated with the process of competing and getting outbid that they act in ways that they normally would never have thought. Overbidding. Settling for a house that they may not have originally envisioned. The list goes on.

Jeff, however, decided to think outside the box. What would happen if another house was purchased (without the added pressure of “living out of a suitcase”, if you will) prior to the sale of the old house? Is it even possible with the banking regulations that were placed upon financial institutions as well as homeowners over the past decade due to the “mortgage meltdown” that happened in 2008 and on? Dodd Frank rules that placed inordinate restrictions on the ability of homeowners to obtain financing left many people unable to get loans in which they previously were easily able to qualify.

Jeff decided to come up with a spreadsheet wherein, if he plugged in some assumptions, he could figure out if it would make economic sense to acquire a new house before selling an old house. The other part of the equation was to find a lender who would allow for a homeowner to purchase a new home without first selling the old home; thus, carrying two mortgages at the same time. Since most conventional lenders would not touch this, Jeff had to look to alternative sources. He found a company called Pacific Private Money, in Novato, CA that specializes in such a product.

Pacific Private Money can lend enough to the borrower to purchase the new home if there is enough equity in the old home to justify a combined Loan to Value (LTV) of 70% or less. Sometimes, if there is not enough equity in the old home, the borrower needs to add cash to bring the LTV to 70%, but, the ability to purchase a new home without having to sell the old one first can solve many issues for the homeowner. First, the new home can be identified without adding pressure since the homeowner is still living in the old house until the new house closes escrow. Second, the stress of moving twice is eliminated. Third, and probably the best (and possibly most surprising) is that this solution may actually cost LESS in terms of increasing net equity to the household than selling the old house and buying a new house with the proceeds from the old house (and new mortgage) in most circumstances wherein the new house is more expensive house than the old house.

In a rising market, the earlier the purchase of the more expensive new house and the delay of the sale of the old will increase the net equity to the homeowner more than the costs associated with carrying two mortgages.

For example, let’s assume the old house is worth $1,000,000 and there is currently a 1st mortgage of $200,000. The homeowner desires to purchase a new home for $1,400,000 and has $100,000 in the bank that can be used for a down payment. We will look at two scenarios; the first is where the homeowner sells the current house, rents for a period of time, and then purchases a new home. The second scenario is where the homeowner borrows the money in order to secure the new home while owning the old home.

Obviously, there are many moving targets with both scenarios, such as how much it will cost to rent a place (in the event of selling the old house first) as well as how long it takes to identify and close on the new house, storage costs for belongings, the cost of obtaining a private loan, and the appreciation assumptions for both houses, just to name a few.

Here is a calculation making the following assumptions; it takes nine months to close on a new house after selling the old house; houses in the area (both old and new houses) are appreciating at 1% per month; interest earned on bank deposits are at 1% per annum; storage costs are $1,000 per month, a conventional bank loan is not available because the homeowner does not qualify and has to use a private loan company; the costs for the private loan are 9% plus 2 points; the interest rate on the old house is 3% per annum.

As you can see, in a rising market, where the new house is worth more than the old house, there is a significant benefit to using a private loan to purchase the new home and sell the old home at a later date. Waiting 9 months to eventually acquire the new house has tremendous opportunity costs, as compared to a net benefit of purchasing the new house right away and eventually selling the old house.

Although assuming a 1% per month appreciation of real estate may seem aggressive, the San Francisco Bay Area, and specifically the Silicon Valley, has experienced such growth. However, even if we lower the appreciation to .5% per month, we still see a fairly significant benefit to purchasing the new house now rather than waiting to first sell the old house and then buy the new house.

Aside from the economic benefit, other factors need to be considered; the lack of stress of moving twice should the homeowner decide to sell the old house first and then purchase the new house; what if the homeowner finds the house of his/her dreams now and does not want to let the house slip away? In today’s market, sellers are not willing to take contingent offers. Can the homeowner budget for both houses at the same time while waiting for the old house to sell? Is the market rising? Is the new house more expensive than the old house? How long will it take to sell the old house? These are just some of the issues to consider before deciding one way or the other; however, and this can’t be stressed enough — when a homeowner finds a house they like, they do not want to lose the opportunity of buying it. This means that they can start looking at new houses before putting their old house on the market. This also allows them time to make any repairs or fix up their old house so as to maximize its value prior to putting it on the market.

Once homeowners know that there is a potential to purchase a new house before selling their old house, they can be proactive in obtaining a commitment letter from the lender. Of course, homeowners should see if they qualify for a conventional loan for buying the new house (owning two houses at once), but they should keep their minds open to procuring a private loan should the bank turn them down. Pacific Private Money is such a private loan company.

 

 

 

WRITTEN BY EDWARD BROWN

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Home Buyers & Sellers, Pay Attention in 2018!

Pay Attention in 2018!

Pay Attention in 2018!

We may have a tricky year ahead of us, so what’s the best and easiest strategy for consistent success in 2018?

Pay Attention!

Start the year with or without New Year’s Resolutions, but commit to success this year by paying attention:

#1. To how well informed you and information sources you rely on are

#2. To what’s really going on around you — real and fake, and

#3. To how you react to what’s going on around you — online and off.

Whether you are a real estate owner or a wanna-be… whether you intend to buy or sell in 2018, so much is shifting in real estate, in the economy, and everywhere else that nothing should be taken for granted or assumed in 2018. Concentrate on getting the facts not just someone else’s bias view of where advantages lie for you.

#1. A lot changed in 2017 and the full implications of those changes will continue to emerge in 2018.

Pay attention to ramifications and compromises, subtle and otherwise, attached to changes in everything from tax law and net neutrality to technology’s continued re-write and disruption of much we’ve take for granted:

  • Real estate ownership will be impacted by changes to tax law, estate planning, resulting neighborhood development, and interactions between these and many more elements. Where will advantages lie for you?
  • Changes in the business world may directly or indirectly influence job or retirement security for your family. This in turn may impact qualification for financing, mortgage renewal, and real estate affordability. Projected reductions in funding and donations for social and community support programs and organizations may have widespread impact in neighborhoods, community development, and in education. These shifts may reduce location benefits which, in turn, can affect real estate value. How will your location be affected in 2018?

#2. Whoever or whatever you blamed for distractions in 2017 will be with you in 2018 and might even be worse.

There are only so many hours in the day and only so many dollars in your pay check. Distractions that erode concentration on your needs and goals, and distractions that feed impulse spending will be expensive in many ways. Pay attention to what takes you off point, off track, and off goal to ensure you stay in control. You may blame others for distracting you, but it’s your powers of concentration that should be continually honed and improved to keep you ahead of the pack.

  • Saving for a down payment, home renovation, or to pay down an existing mortgage requires a written budget strategy to guide you toward clearly-defined results.
  • Paying monthly condominium fees, mortgage payments, or heating bills is exhausting when approached as month-to-month catch-up. Shift your focus to cutting costs and increasing income long-term and you’ll move beyond a monthly survival perspective to establish a constructive, long-term frame of reference for success.
  • Steady, dramatic increases in online shopping over the 2017 holiday season mean many households may be combining the impulse spending facilitated by credit cards and click-here shopping carts to undermine their budgets even more dramatically than ever. As the volume of online shoppers increases, convenience, cost saving, and product satisfaction may be compromised, so it’s only the novelty of online shopping that addicts. What’s all this got to do with achieving your core real estate ownership goals?

#3. Significant amounts of what you believed you knew in 2017 about real estate, finance, insurance, home security, mortgages, work, and the internet will be out of date in 2018.

Pay attention to which laws, regulations, services, and real estate expenses have actually changed not just been endlessly, sensationally rehashed in the media and online. Accurate information and clever strategies are gold.

  • Tweets, posts, and other online content arrive in increasingly-overwhelming rates and volumes. This leaves less and less time to uncover facts and realities and to actually learn and think about relevance to you. From shopping or applying for a mortgage to searching for a new home or viewing property, virtual video and online content bring these and other real estate activities onto your laptop and your mobile phone. Is this distance-learning leaving you better informed and smarter real estate-wise than face-to-face meetings with real estate experts and hands-on location and property investigations?
  • Searching out professionals who keep up with change within their profession is a challenge. Time pressures leave some professionals parroting what they hear and see in media and online instead of carrying out thorough research themselves. How do you make sure you receive the professional advice you need to interpret changes from your real estate point of view?

Realty Times and my “Decisions & Communities” column will continue to provide you with real estate facts and perspectives that keep you asking more of yourself and the professionals who advise and serve you.

Let’s meet the challenges and opportunities of 2018 head on!

 

 

 

 

WRITTEN BY