Moving To A 55 and Older Community: Is It Right For You?

Moving To A 55 and Older Community: Is It Right For You?

Moving To A 55 and Older Community: Is It Right For You?mortgages.com

For a lot of people a 55 and older community can mean spending your retirement living with people your own age, being active, and exploring new hobbies right in your own neighborhood. It sounds a little like the social life of college without the studying. And who wouldn’t want that? What should you know before you buy?

Social club

One of the benefits of a 55 and older community is the social aspect. Not only is it easy to meet people your age, but most communities also have planned events ranging from golf to art. We always talk about why location matters in real estate. And this is no different. Think about what you want to spend your days doing? If you love skiing, Florida probably isn’t the best location for you.

Security

Most 55 and older communities are gated and have private security. Find out exactly what kind of security your community will offer. If this is going to be your second home, the extra security can bring big peace of mind when you’re away.

No one under 55 allowed

This one is a given. If you’re thinking about a 55 and older community, you probably consider this a pro. But it can quickly turn into a con. You might not realize how much you enjoyed the sound of kids playing in the street until you don’t hear it anymore. And if there’s a family emergency, it might mean that your adult kids or grandkids couldn’t live with you. There might also be restrictions on how long younger visitors can stay. And that might mean the end of Camp Grandma during the summer.

The old neighborhood

Don’t underestimate the connection you feel with your old neighborhood, especially if it’s where you raised your family. If that’s the case, it might be worth it to keep both homes for now and work your first home into your estate planning. That way it can stay in the family.

HOA

All those activities and amenities come a at a price, homeowners association fees. Like any home with a homeowners association, there might be strict rules about things like what color you paint your home, how many (and what type of) pets you can have, and what you can plant in your yard. That might be a fair tradeoff for you, but if you’re used to making home improvements on a whim, you might want to think twice.

Advertisements

Taking A Tax Loss On Your Principal Residence

Taking A Tax Loss On Your Principal Residence

Taking A Tax Loss On Your Principal Residence

Question. When my wife died several years ago, I sold the large house we were living in and bought a smaller house.. That purchase was at the top of the local real estate market. I have just purchased a retirement home and would like to sell my current property. However, after real estate commissions and sales expenses, I am facing a sizable loss — and my accountant tells me this loss is not tax deductible. Can you suggest any solutions so that I do not lose my long-term investment?

Answer. Your accountant is correct. Current tax law permits a tax loss deduction for investment property but not for a principal residence. Although it appears that some day in the foreseeable future Congress will provide similar tax relief for the American Homeowner, at present no such laws are on the books. In fact, the current Congress appears intent on reducing homeowner rights and benefits.

You do, however, have a few options.

First, to the extent you can make projections, try to analyze the future marketability of your house. Will the house come back up in value, or will it continue to deteriorate? If you keep the house for a longer period of time, will you have to make a number of costly repairs and thus be throwing good money after bad? In other words, does it make sense to “take your loss and run?”

Second, if you decide it makes sense not to sell now, rent the house out for a year or two. Abandon the house as your principal residence; pay taxes where your retirement home is located, get a new driver’s license and new voter registration card at a different address. Let your friends and relatives know that you no longer call that property your “home.”

A year or two from now, depending on your financial and personal needs, you can then sell the property. Since it will then be investment real estate, you may be able to deduct some of your tax loss on your income tax return (although you should confirm the amount with your accountant).

If you do not need the money — or the tax loss — and if the rental income from the house is worthwhile, you can continue to rent out the house.

Third, once you have converted the property to that of an investment (rather than your principal residence), you might want to consider swapping the house under the “like-kind” (Starker) exchange. Such an exchange would permit you to obtain alternative real estate, without currently having to pay tax on any profit. Obviously, however, if you have no gain, there is no need to consider a Starker exchange. The rules for such an exchange are complex, and have been discussed in earlier columns.

Finally, if you have children, why not consider keeping the real estate until your death. Under current tax law, (which may change in the current Congress) your children will inherit the property at what is known as the “stepped-up” basis. Oversimplified, this means that the children’s tax basis is the value of the property at the date of your death — and not your tax basis. Your tax advisors should be asked to analyze all of these various options.

Your question also raised a very important issue facing many older homeowners– and one that is often overlooked or forgotten. Many homeowners purchased their first home many years ago at low prices. Over the years — especially in the l970s and l980s — real estate appreciated rapidly. Many homeowners moved from one house to another, and took advantage of the roll-over. Now, when they want to sell their last house — or purchase down in price as you are considering — the tax issues become very important.

Let us look at the following example. Assume that in 1970, you and your wife purchased your first house for $30,000. Over the years, you added $20,000 in improvements, and thus the basis for tax purposes (purchase price plus improvements) for you and your wife was $25,000 each. In 1987, you sold the house for $200,000, thus generating what you probably believed was a paper profit of $150,000.

However, since your wife died before you sold the first house, your basis is increased by virtue of the “stepped up” basis. At the time of your wife’s death, the property was worth $200,000. Under the tax laws, you inherited your wife’s basis as of the date of her death; in our example, her basis was $100,000. Thus, for tax purposes, the basis of your first house when you sold it was $125,000 ($25,000 plus $100,000).

Your house was sold for $200,000, and thus your profit was $75,000. But since you purchased your current house within two years from the time the first house was sold, you qualified for the roll-over, and this profit was used to reduce the basis of the Alexandria house. Accordingly, although you paid $300,000 for the new property, in reality its basis is $225,000.

If you sell the house now for $220,000, even after paying real estate commissions and other expenses, your paper loss will not be as great as you think.

However, this is tax talk; you are looking at an actual loss of $80,000, since you purchased the house at $300,000 and now can only sell it for $220,000. There are a lot of people who purchased real estate at the peak of the market, — and despite significant increases in value — many homeowners are still unfortunately under water.

And the rollover has long been replaced by the up-to-$250,000/$500,000 exclusion of gain.

 

 

WRITTEN BY

Home Negotiation tips to close the deal

Home Negotiation tips to close the deal

  There is no simple formula for home negotiations.  There is no if C happens then you should go to counter F.  It’s not that simple.  Some of it comes with past experience.  Some if it comes with being able to read the opposite party and to read between the lines.  This home negotiation tip is for both buyers and sellers.  Negotiating the sales price or repairs on a home is so different than many other types of sales negotiation. That is what confuses people. Here in Detroit we have many Tier 1, Tier 2 and 3 negotiators that deal with Ford, GM, and Chrysler. These negotiators are hard nosed and good at what they do, and they wonder why the tactics they use everyday do not work with home sales.  In most cases you cannot be a hard nosed negotiator and expect the other party to succumb to your demands or to close the deal.

There are a few reasons why hard nosed negotiations do not work and why some negotiators end up frustrated and not at the closing table.  After all the ultimate goal is to get to the closing table.

1.) There are emotions involved. Sellers have an emotional attachment to the house because they have remodeled the home, or raised their children there, or think the house is the greatest in the world even though it needs major updating. Seller’s sometimes have the rose colored glasses on. Buyers are usually less emotional about the house, but they too get emotional sometimes when the negotiations get tough. In car sales, equipment sales, and many other types of sales and sales jobs there is no emotions. It’s about product and price. Not so with all home sales.

2.) In equipment sales or negotiating with the big auto companies both sides want to make the deal work and work hard to come to an agreement.  They are negotiating to meet in the middle because there are a limited amount of companies to deal with.  There is may be prior relationships between the companies.  In house sales that is not always the case.  Seller’s usually DO NOT HAVE TO SELL THE HOUSE, nor DO BUYERS HAVE TO BUY.   The buyers can move onto the next home, and the sellers can keep turning down offers as long as they want. In equipment sales there are usually only a few companies to choose from. Not in real estate there are always more homes coming to the market. They may not be as nice, or as updated, but there will be more homes coming to the market if you are willing to wait.  They can put up the house for sale next year, or wait until spring to buy.

It is the same with sellers. I just heard yesterday about a seller that has turned down 5 offers. After 5 offers you should get an idea of what a buyer is willing to pay for your home. Yet there are some unreasonable sellers that will still want more after multiple offers on their house. The seller just rejected my clients offer that was higher than the previous 4 offers.  Sellers and buyers do not have to close the deal. And it is common for buyers or a seller to quit negotiating and walk away from the deal. Sometimes they just don’t care or are unreasonable in their demands and wants. It is common for one party to base their price in reality and the other party in the transaction living in dream land.

So when negotiating on a sales price you want to be the one grounded in reality. You want your agent to look at the recent solds in the neighborhood. That way the agent or you can look at the recent sold prices of comparable homes and be able to give a range of what the home is worth. That is so important whether you are the seller or buyer. Know what the current market value of the home is your priority.

Having the knowledge of the range of what the home is worth gives you a basis of what to offer (if you are the buyer ) or what to accept (if you are the seller). If you are unreasonable in what you want then do not be surprised when the other party stops negotiating or walks away. It is the same way for you. If the other party is unreasonable in their demands then it is smart for you to walk away.   The other party has an incentive to close on the home, but they cannot be forced to accept what you think or what you want. Even if you are right on, they may be the unreasonable one. There is nothing you can do about it. Many buyers do not have to buy the one house or the seller does not have to sell.  That is the difference in home sales in most cases…. they do not have to.  If you are a hard nosed negotiator you may learn the hard way and lose the house.  So the key is how bad do you want to buy or sell?

I hope this negotiating tip of understanding the mind set of the opposite party, and what has to be done in the home sales process will help make your home sales negotiation more fruitful. It will save you aggravation if you understand this up front. It does not matter if it is waterfront home for sale in Oakland County or any home in Mesquite, NV. …..realize that many times hard nosed negotiations fail in the real estate business.

The goal should always be to find a win win for both parties.

 

 

What your clients should avoid during the home loan process

What your clients should avoid
during the home loan process
Make sure nothing gets in the way of achieving your clients’ home financing goals. Some DON’Ts may seem obvious, but others not so much. Check out this list to make sure your clients avoid the TOP 10 DON’Ts during the process of buying their new home.
  • Please don’t send any wire transfers throughout the loan process to anyone, without speaking directly to your Loan Officer on the phone first.
  • Transfer money between accounts, unless receiving complete documentation from your bank itemizing all transfers.
  • Withdraw or deposit large sums into your checking or savings accounts unless absolutely necessary.
  • Make any career moves.
  • Allow your bank accounts to go in the negative, even if you have overdraft protection.
  • Apply for new credit in any form, or apply for credit to consolidate.
  • Have a friend or relative pay for anything related to the purchase of the home (appraisal, earnest money, down payment, etc), since gifts are only allowed under certain guidelines.
  • Keep cash in a safe or an overseas account if you plan to use these funds as a down payment. Inquire about how and when would be the best time to put funds into your U.S. bank account if needed.
  • Close credit card accounts; if you close a credit card account, it may appear that your debt ratio has gone up.
  • Give your personal information to anyone else who might run your credit report as credit inquiries may hurt your score.
     
  CONTACT ME TODAY!  
     
 
     
     
 
  Photo   Patricia Chaffin
Loan Consultant
NMLS# 343850

C: (702) 375-2199
P: (702) 857-8204
F: (702) 446-6581

 
 
     
 
  E-Mail Me

Visit My Website

 
 
     
 
  Logo  
 
     
     
     
         

 

GET CONNECTED | Facebook LinkedIn Twitter YouTube Google + Pinterest Instagram
Equal Opportunity Housing State Licensing Information

NMLS ID#6606. © New American Funding. New American and New American Funding are registered trademarks of Broker Solutions, DBA New American Funding. All Rights Reserved.

 

1348 Paseo Verde Pkwy, # 200
Henderson, NV 89012

CTD

Tax Free Exchange

Tax Free Exchange: A Valuable Alternative To A Home Sale

Tax Free Exchange: A Valuable Alternative To A Home Sale

Congress is currently talking tax reform. Two very important real estate benefits are on the so-called “chopping block”, either to be completely eliminated or significantly curtailed.

It is doubtful that the home owner exclusion of up to $500,000 (or $250,000 if you file a single tax return) of profit will be impacted; there are too many homeowner voters who will forcefully object. But investors do not have the same strong lobbyist who can make the case for preserving the “like kind” exchange. So if you have an investment property, now might be the time to consider doing an exchange.

Residential homeowners have a number of tax benefits, the most important of which is the exclusion of up to $500,000 (or $250,000 if you file a single tax return) profit made on the sale of your principal residence. But real estate investors — large and small — still have to pay capital gains tax when they sell their investments. And since most investors depreciated their properties over a number of years, the capital gains tax can be quite large.

There is a way of deferring payment of this tax, and it is known as a Like-Kind Exchange under Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code. In my opinion, these exchange provisions are still an important tool for any real estate investor.

The exchange process is not a “tax free” device, although people refer to it as a “tax-free exchange.” It is also called a “Starker exchange” or a “deferred exchange.” It will not relieve you from the ultimate obligation to pay the capital gains tax. It will, however, allow you to defer paying that tax until you sell your last investment property — or you die.

The rules are complex, but here is a general overview of the process.

Section 1031 permits a delay (non-recognition) of gain only if the following conditions are met:

First, the property transferred (called by the IRS the “relinquished property”) and the exchange property (“replacement property”) must be “property held for productive use in trade, in business or for investment.” Neither property in this exchange can be your principal residence, unless you have abandoned it as your personal house.

Second, there must be an exchange; the IRS wants to ensure that a transaction called an exchange is not really a sale and a subsequent purchase.

Third, the replacement property must be of “like kind.” The courts have given a very broad definition to this concept. As a general rule, all real estate is considered “like kind” with all other real estate. Thus, a condominium unit can be swapped for an office building, a single family home for raw land, or a farm for commercial or industrial property.

Once you meet these tests, it is important that you determine the tax consequences. If you do a like-kind exchange, your profit will be deferred until you sell the replacement property. However, it must be noted that the cost basis of the new property in most cases will be the basis of the old property. Discuss this with your accountant to determine whether the savings by using the like-kind exchange will make up for the lower cost basis on your new property. And discuss also whether you might be better off selling the property, biting the bullet and paying the tax, but not have to be a landlord again.

The traditional, classic exchange (A and B swap properties) rarely works. Not everyone is able to find replacement property before they sell their own property. In a case involving a man named Mr. Starker, the court held that the exchange does not have to be simultaneous.

Congress did not like this open-ended interpretation, and in 1984, two major limitations were imposed on the Starker (non-simultaneous) exchange.

First, the replacement property must be identified before the 45th day after the day on which the original (relinquished) property is transferred.

Second, the replacement property must be purchased no later than 180 days after the taxpayer transfers his original property, or the due date (with any extension) of the taxpayer’s return of the tax imposed for the year in which the transfer is made. These are very important time limitations, which should be noted on your calendar when you first enter into a 1031 exchange.

In 1989, Congress added two additional technical restrictions. First, property in the United States cannot be exchanged for property outside the United States.

Second, if property received in a like-kind exchange between related persons is disposed of within two years after the date of the last transfer, the original exchange will not qualify for non-recognition of gain.

In May of 1991, the Internal Revenue Service adopted final regulations which clarified many of the issues.

This column cannot analyze all of these regulations. The following, however, will highlight some of the major issues:

1. Identification of the replacement property within 45 days. According to the IRS, the taxpayer may identify more than one property as replacement property. However, the maximum number of replacement properties that the taxpayer may identify is either three properties of any fair market value, or any larger number as long as their aggregate fair market value does not exceed 200% of the aggregate fair market value of all of the relinquished properties.

Furthermore, the replacement property or properties must be unambiguously described in a written document. According to the IRS, real property must be described by a legal description, street address or distinguishable name (e.g., The Camelot Apartment Building).”

2. Who is the neutral party? Conceptually, the relinquished property is sold, and the sales proceeds are held in escrow by a neutral party, until the replacement property is obtained. Generally, an intermediary or escrow agent is involved in the transaction. In order to make absolutely sure the taxpayer does not have control or access to these funds during this interim period, the IRS requires that this agent cannot be the taxpayer or a related party. The holder of the escrow account can be an attorney or a broker engaged primarily to facilitate the exchange.

3. Interest on the exchange proceeds. One of the underlying concepts of a successful 1031 exchange is the absolute requirement that not one penny of the sales proceeds be available to the seller of the relinquished property under any circumstances unless the transactions do not take place.

Generally, the sales proceeds are placed in escrow with a neutral third party. Since these proceeds may not be used for the purchase of the replacement property for up to 180 days, the amount of interest earned can be significant — or at least it used to be until banks starting paying pennies on our savings accounts.

Surprisingly, the Internal Revenue Service permitted the taxpayer to earn interest — referred to as “growth factor” — on these escrowed funds. Any such interest to the taxpayer has to be reported as earned income. Once the replacement property is obtained by the exchanger, the interest can either be used for the purchase of that property, or paid directly to the exchanger.

The rules are quite complex, and you must seek both legal and tax accounting advice before you enter into any like-kind exchange transaction.

 

 

 

WRITTEN BY

Why Do Home Buyers Wait For Spring?

Why Do Home Buyers Wait For Spring?

Search Mesquite NV. homes for sale at; Mesquite-realestate.com

Why Do Home Buyers Wait For Spring?

Why do they wait until the competition ramps up and all the other buyers are ready to buy? Why do buyers wait for the “hot” spring market with its price increases and multiple offers?

  • Some buyers delay because they are doing what is expected – “we’re always done it this way” thinking is common in real estate.
  • Others may need the first warm rays of sun and the fragrance of spring flowers for motivation.
  • There may be more listings later in the spring, as sellers react for the same two reasons above, but increased buyer competition may cancel out advantages.Indications are that this will be an active spring market with real estate price and mortgage rate increases which extend deep into 2017. Getting ahead of this momentum may bring benefits and real estate you can love.

    You’re got nothing to lose by shopping now and a lot to gain. Here are Five Smart-Buying Tips for Getting a Jump on Spring:

    Tip #1: Find a real estate professional who is has a lot of experience in the locations you’d consider and with the type of property (detached house or condominium) you want to own.

    Learn what you need to do to prepare to make an offer and what to look for in the properties you’ll view. You’ll also discover the listing price range to shop in and which are the best locations in your buying range. If you don’t start this strategic relationship first, you’ll miss out on many of the advantages of an early start.

    Tip #2: Build your professional team to be ready for offer time.

    Your real estate professional may have recommendations for mortgage brokers, home inspectors, real estate lawyers, and surveyors. Take three names for each and interview them to determine the fit and what they consider the extent of their professional responsibilities to you.

    • For example, concentrate on locating a mortgage broker who has the experience, contacts, and interest to help you finance your purchase. The questions you ask the real estate professional about price range, size of mortgage, and steps in the buying process should also be directed to the mortgage broker. The mortgage pre-approval letter, which may be essential at offer time, will only be truly useful when you’ve been professionally vetted and stamped as mortgage-worthy.

    #Tip 3: Stop Wasting Time and Concentrate on Real Estate.

    There’s a lot to learn and to think about when buying real estate, so your productivity matters. The US 2016 versionof Deloitte’s sixth annual Mobile Consumer Survey revealed more online time wasting than ever:

    • More than 40 percent of consumers check their phones within five minutes of waking – text messages (35%) and email (22%)
    • Each day is disrupted since we look at our phones approximately 47 times. Sleep is disrupted: more than 30% check their devices 5 minutes before sleep and about 50 percent in the middle of the night.
    • Every 60 seconds on Facebook, 510,000 comments are posted, 293,000 statuses are updated, and 136,000 photos are uploaded. The average Facebook visit is 20 minutes; Facebook reports visitors spend more than 50 minutes a day using Facebook, Instagram and Messenger. (Source: Zephoria)
    • Millennials (25 to 34-year-olds) demonstrated higher levels of mobile device interest and use than the phone-hooked younger demographic.
    • Postpone binge watching the latest hyped series until after you buy your dream home.

    Tip #4: Sell Yourself on Success

    According to sales inspiration Dale Carnegie, author of How to Win Friends and Influence People, “The only way to influence someone is to find out what they want, and show them how to get it.” To achieve success, clarify, with the help of professionals, exactly what you want and need from a real estate purchase. Then decide to get it. The professional team you select will provide the know-how and will help you refine your dreams into an achievable goal for the location and price range involved. Do your homework, so you understand what they show you.

    Tip #5: Motivate Yourself During This “Buy-athon”

    What motivates you to want to own real estate? Postpone as many non-real-estate distractions as possible. Clarify what will sustain you through the often-stressful buying process. Use slogans, affirmations, or whatever it takes to persist. You may make offers and lose out on one or more properties before you find yours. Persist using self-motivation – that’s your job. No one else can motivate you. No one cares as much about the outcome as you do.

    What are you waiting for? Get the jump on spring!

    Final Smart-Buying Tip:Don’t get in the way of the professionals finding out what you want and helping you get it.