Tax Free Exchange

Tax Free Exchange: A Valuable Alternative To A Home Sale

Tax Free Exchange: A Valuable Alternative To A Home Sale

Congress is currently talking tax reform. Two very important real estate benefits are on the so-called “chopping block”, either to be completely eliminated or significantly curtailed.

It is doubtful that the home owner exclusion of up to $500,000 (or $250,000 if you file a single tax return) of profit will be impacted; there are too many homeowner voters who will forcefully object. But investors do not have the same strong lobbyist who can make the case for preserving the “like kind” exchange. So if you have an investment property, now might be the time to consider doing an exchange.

Residential homeowners have a number of tax benefits, the most important of which is the exclusion of up to $500,000 (or $250,000 if you file a single tax return) profit made on the sale of your principal residence. But real estate investors — large and small — still have to pay capital gains tax when they sell their investments. And since most investors depreciated their properties over a number of years, the capital gains tax can be quite large.

There is a way of deferring payment of this tax, and it is known as a Like-Kind Exchange under Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code. In my opinion, these exchange provisions are still an important tool for any real estate investor.

The exchange process is not a “tax free” device, although people refer to it as a “tax-free exchange.” It is also called a “Starker exchange” or a “deferred exchange.” It will not relieve you from the ultimate obligation to pay the capital gains tax. It will, however, allow you to defer paying that tax until you sell your last investment property — or you die.

The rules are complex, but here is a general overview of the process.

Section 1031 permits a delay (non-recognition) of gain only if the following conditions are met:

First, the property transferred (called by the IRS the “relinquished property”) and the exchange property (“replacement property”) must be “property held for productive use in trade, in business or for investment.” Neither property in this exchange can be your principal residence, unless you have abandoned it as your personal house.

Second, there must be an exchange; the IRS wants to ensure that a transaction called an exchange is not really a sale and a subsequent purchase.

Third, the replacement property must be of “like kind.” The courts have given a very broad definition to this concept. As a general rule, all real estate is considered “like kind” with all other real estate. Thus, a condominium unit can be swapped for an office building, a single family home for raw land, or a farm for commercial or industrial property.

Once you meet these tests, it is important that you determine the tax consequences. If you do a like-kind exchange, your profit will be deferred until you sell the replacement property. However, it must be noted that the cost basis of the new property in most cases will be the basis of the old property. Discuss this with your accountant to determine whether the savings by using the like-kind exchange will make up for the lower cost basis on your new property. And discuss also whether you might be better off selling the property, biting the bullet and paying the tax, but not have to be a landlord again.

The traditional, classic exchange (A and B swap properties) rarely works. Not everyone is able to find replacement property before they sell their own property. In a case involving a man named Mr. Starker, the court held that the exchange does not have to be simultaneous.

Congress did not like this open-ended interpretation, and in 1984, two major limitations were imposed on the Starker (non-simultaneous) exchange.

First, the replacement property must be identified before the 45th day after the day on which the original (relinquished) property is transferred.

Second, the replacement property must be purchased no later than 180 days after the taxpayer transfers his original property, or the due date (with any extension) of the taxpayer’s return of the tax imposed for the year in which the transfer is made. These are very important time limitations, which should be noted on your calendar when you first enter into a 1031 exchange.

In 1989, Congress added two additional technical restrictions. First, property in the United States cannot be exchanged for property outside the United States.

Second, if property received in a like-kind exchange between related persons is disposed of within two years after the date of the last transfer, the original exchange will not qualify for non-recognition of gain.

In May of 1991, the Internal Revenue Service adopted final regulations which clarified many of the issues.

This column cannot analyze all of these regulations. The following, however, will highlight some of the major issues:

1. Identification of the replacement property within 45 days. According to the IRS, the taxpayer may identify more than one property as replacement property. However, the maximum number of replacement properties that the taxpayer may identify is either three properties of any fair market value, or any larger number as long as their aggregate fair market value does not exceed 200% of the aggregate fair market value of all of the relinquished properties.

Furthermore, the replacement property or properties must be unambiguously described in a written document. According to the IRS, real property must be described by a legal description, street address or distinguishable name (e.g., The Camelot Apartment Building).”

2. Who is the neutral party? Conceptually, the relinquished property is sold, and the sales proceeds are held in escrow by a neutral party, until the replacement property is obtained. Generally, an intermediary or escrow agent is involved in the transaction. In order to make absolutely sure the taxpayer does not have control or access to these funds during this interim period, the IRS requires that this agent cannot be the taxpayer or a related party. The holder of the escrow account can be an attorney or a broker engaged primarily to facilitate the exchange.

3. Interest on the exchange proceeds. One of the underlying concepts of a successful 1031 exchange is the absolute requirement that not one penny of the sales proceeds be available to the seller of the relinquished property under any circumstances unless the transactions do not take place.

Generally, the sales proceeds are placed in escrow with a neutral third party. Since these proceeds may not be used for the purchase of the replacement property for up to 180 days, the amount of interest earned can be significant — or at least it used to be until banks starting paying pennies on our savings accounts.

Surprisingly, the Internal Revenue Service permitted the taxpayer to earn interest — referred to as “growth factor” — on these escrowed funds. Any such interest to the taxpayer has to be reported as earned income. Once the replacement property is obtained by the exchanger, the interest can either be used for the purchase of that property, or paid directly to the exchanger.

The rules are quite complex, and you must seek both legal and tax accounting advice before you enter into any like-kind exchange transaction.

 

 

 

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Why Do Home Buyers Wait For Spring?

Why Do Home Buyers Wait For Spring?

Search Mesquite NV. homes for sale at; Mesquite-realestate.com

Why Do Home Buyers Wait For Spring?

Why do they wait until the competition ramps up and all the other buyers are ready to buy? Why do buyers wait for the “hot” spring market with its price increases and multiple offers?

  • Some buyers delay because they are doing what is expected – “we’re always done it this way” thinking is common in real estate.
  • Others may need the first warm rays of sun and the fragrance of spring flowers for motivation.
  • There may be more listings later in the spring, as sellers react for the same two reasons above, but increased buyer competition may cancel out advantages.Indications are that this will be an active spring market with real estate price and mortgage rate increases which extend deep into 2017. Getting ahead of this momentum may bring benefits and real estate you can love.

    You’re got nothing to lose by shopping now and a lot to gain. Here are Five Smart-Buying Tips for Getting a Jump on Spring:

    Tip #1: Find a real estate professional who is has a lot of experience in the locations you’d consider and with the type of property (detached house or condominium) you want to own.

    Learn what you need to do to prepare to make an offer and what to look for in the properties you’ll view. You’ll also discover the listing price range to shop in and which are the best locations in your buying range. If you don’t start this strategic relationship first, you’ll miss out on many of the advantages of an early start.

    Tip #2: Build your professional team to be ready for offer time.

    Your real estate professional may have recommendations for mortgage brokers, home inspectors, real estate lawyers, and surveyors. Take three names for each and interview them to determine the fit and what they consider the extent of their professional responsibilities to you.

    • For example, concentrate on locating a mortgage broker who has the experience, contacts, and interest to help you finance your purchase. The questions you ask the real estate professional about price range, size of mortgage, and steps in the buying process should also be directed to the mortgage broker. The mortgage pre-approval letter, which may be essential at offer time, will only be truly useful when you’ve been professionally vetted and stamped as mortgage-worthy.

    #Tip 3: Stop Wasting Time and Concentrate on Real Estate.

    There’s a lot to learn and to think about when buying real estate, so your productivity matters. The US 2016 versionof Deloitte’s sixth annual Mobile Consumer Survey revealed more online time wasting than ever:

    • More than 40 percent of consumers check their phones within five minutes of waking – text messages (35%) and email (22%)
    • Each day is disrupted since we look at our phones approximately 47 times. Sleep is disrupted: more than 30% check their devices 5 minutes before sleep and about 50 percent in the middle of the night.
    • Every 60 seconds on Facebook, 510,000 comments are posted, 293,000 statuses are updated, and 136,000 photos are uploaded. The average Facebook visit is 20 minutes; Facebook reports visitors spend more than 50 minutes a day using Facebook, Instagram and Messenger. (Source: Zephoria)
    • Millennials (25 to 34-year-olds) demonstrated higher levels of mobile device interest and use than the phone-hooked younger demographic.
    • Postpone binge watching the latest hyped series until after you buy your dream home.

    Tip #4: Sell Yourself on Success

    According to sales inspiration Dale Carnegie, author of How to Win Friends and Influence People, “The only way to influence someone is to find out what they want, and show them how to get it.” To achieve success, clarify, with the help of professionals, exactly what you want and need from a real estate purchase. Then decide to get it. The professional team you select will provide the know-how and will help you refine your dreams into an achievable goal for the location and price range involved. Do your homework, so you understand what they show you.

    Tip #5: Motivate Yourself During This “Buy-athon”

    What motivates you to want to own real estate? Postpone as many non-real-estate distractions as possible. Clarify what will sustain you through the often-stressful buying process. Use slogans, affirmations, or whatever it takes to persist. You may make offers and lose out on one or more properties before you find yours. Persist using self-motivation – that’s your job. No one else can motivate you. No one cares as much about the outcome as you do.

    What are you waiting for? Get the jump on spring!

    Final Smart-Buying Tip:Don’t get in the way of the professionals finding out what you want and helping you get it.

Nevada Real Estate

Nevada Real Estate laws and practices differ from other states. I will help you navigate the complexities and pitfalls of property purchases. I understand the market in the area you desire and will be your advocate throughout the process. Isn’t it nice to know that you have someone on your side looking out for your interests? I trust that you will find your experience pleasant and are confident that once you use me as your Agent you will insist in doing so in all of your future Real Estate purchases.

 

Vacation and Second Home Properties

Whether you are considering a vacation or second home for a weekend escape or a family legacy property let your me guide you through the decision making process as well as the transaction assuring a smooth and enjoyable experience.

Many of these properties are located in resort areas not in the same State or region as your primary home and are subject to local restrictions, taxes and regulations. Dealing with homeowners associations, management companies, local lending, Insurance, covenants, building regulations, Title issues, well permits, weather conditions that might affect value, transportation and technology options can all be a challenge particularly if you are trying to deal with these issues from a distance. Often times I can show you how you can turn these possible pitfalls into advantages with their local knowledge and expertise.

I want you to enjoy your vacation or second home property bringing you and your family great memories for years to come. By using me as a resource before, during and after the transaction with their attention to detail and guidance will allow you this opportunity.

Condominiums

Many second home owners find that condominiums are an attractive property type for a variety of reasons. They allow more time for enjoyment without a lot of worries like maintenance and daily tasks. They can also offer amenities that are not easily available to single family home owners like swimming pools, shuttle services, game rooms, etc. In many areas the possibility also exists that your unit can be rented out to tourists on a nightly or weekly basis helping offset some of your ownership costs. Naturally there is a fee for all of these services but since the costs are shared amongst all of the owners may make it more manageable for the individual owners.

All complexes should have a Home Owners Association (HOA) and in many states it is required. In most cases the HOA contracts with a management company to handle the day to day items needing attention as well as provide a reservation service to manage the rentals. In most cases the HOA meets annually to discuss items pertaining to the property and the management of those items. It is important prior to ownership to understand how the HOA functions and what their contractual relationship is with the management company. Review the HOA financials, Rules and Regulations and, at least, two years of HOA and Board of Directors meeting minutes. Often these will not be released to you until you have a unit under contract. Meet with the President of the HOA as well as the property manager to better understand if this is a complex that appeals to you. Remember also that once you are an owner you are part of the HOA and part of the decision making process.

HOA dues can cover a variety of items and it is important to understand what those items are. Dues can cover trash service, water, common amenities such as hot tubs, television, exterior building insurance, lawn and driveway maintenance, etc. HOA dues may be collected on a monthly, quarterly or yearly basis.

Most management companies provide the HOA a ten or twenty year forecast of what maintenance issues might be upcoming, like replacement of roofs or sidewalks and the approximate costs involved. This is how the HOA can determine the HOA fees to the individual property owners (usually allocated on a sq. ft. basis). If the property is in a short term rental location they will most likely manage your unit and take care of guest check in, cleaning and maintenance. Their fee is a percentage of the rental income. Find out what this percentage is and what they provide for this fee.

In situations where short term rental income of your unit is possible the management company may inspect and rate your unit annually. The management company’s desire is to attract as many return guests as possible so they generally rent the nicest units first meaning more income for the owner (and perhaps more wear and tear). In many instances the management company has someone on staff that can guide you through the cost benefit or upgrading your unit. Find out what your unit is rated and if there is a benefit to upgrading the unit. Also get rental income figures for like units understanding that individual units may vary due to location within the project and owner usage.

Single Family Homes

Whether your desire is to own a secluded cabin in the woods or a home on a golf course, beach or ski slope determining your needs and how you plan on using this home are essential to your selection process. Will you be using this property seasonally or just on weekends, as a gathering place for friends and relatives for holidays or simply an escape from the stresses of everyday living?  Emotions play a large part in your property selection, as it should. However don’t allow your emotions to be the overriding decider.

There are many factors that need to be considered to insure that you will be able to enjoy your escape property. Most important on this list is what will happen to the home when you are not there? What attention to the home might be needed in your absence?

The benefit of single family home ownership is that you have more flexibility on individual choices. The challenge is more daily attention may be required. There are management companies who specialize in caretaking of single family homes and many offer a menu of options. Understanding the costs and paring down what you need or desire will help you determine what the costs might be. Also understanding local zoning regulations and common interest community’s rules and regulations might determine if this home is appropriate for your desired use.

Other determining factors might be property taxes (some states charge higher property taxes on out of state owners), utility costs, transportation costs and options. Local issues such as snow load or flooding, pest control or mold are also vital pieces of information. Once under contract an inspection should be conducted and in many areas of the United States radon can be a factor. This is relatively simple and inexpensive to mitigate and often something the Seller will pay for.

Land

Perhaps instead of purchasing a pre existing condominium or single family home your desire is to build your dream home. One might think that land would be fairly straight forward to purchase. However there are many things to think about particularly as you move forward to building that special home. Again, understand the covenants of the neighborhood and what you can and cannot do on your property. Are there Square footage minimums or maximums? Perhaps there are architectural guidelines or an architectural committee that must approve your design and finish.

Be sure and negotiate the seller providing you with a survey. During your inspection period it might be a wise idea to have an engineer conduct a soils test to see how easy or difficult it will be to build on the site. Is the municipal water and sewer? If so are there tap fees to hook on. If municipal water and sewer are not available is it possible to dig for a well and at what cost? What type of water is generally found in the area? Check to see if the local regulations allow for a leach field or merely a sewer vault and determine what the cost is to pump out the vault. What is your source of heat? Check to see if natural gas is available or if you need to go with an individual propane tank. Understand the plusses and minuses of owning or leasing the tank.

Interview a local architect or two who can give you an approximation on a dollar per square foot basis on building in the area. Check with the City or County building department to see what the set-backs are and if there are any governmental regulations that you should be aware of.

 

As you can see there are a myriad of issues that need attention and direction to insure that your choice of product type will bring you and your family the enjoyment of ownership and usage that you are seeking in a second home or vacation property. Particularly if you are attempting to do much of this from afar the task can be daunting. Remember that you are not alone in this process. I’m here to help you navigate through the issues and process until your purchase comes to fruition. In most cases I will continue to be a source of information and advice long after your purchase. Isn’t it assuring to know that you have a trusted advocate in your corner and on your side?

Housing Considerations For Retirement Living

When the topic of Retirement Living comes up there are a number of special considerations that are usually included in the conversation. This article will discuss some of the absolutes in any search for property for a retired homeowner.

Low maintenance.

Usually one of the reasons for a move is to avoid some of the maintenance obligations that come with a larger traditional home. A good home for the retirement lifestyle will either be low maintenance or there will be a dedicated maintenance crew to take care of the maintenance. Often the best home with combine both. As an example a condominium normally will have a crew to take care of the exterior and sometimes this same arrangement would cover interior maintenance items like plumbing, heating, and air-conditioning

Easy on the knees

Even if there are no mobility impairments now, a good home for retirement will take into account that there will likely be mobility impairments in the future. That is why the vast majority of retirement communities have all the primary living spaces on the main floor. If more space is needed for things like visitor rooms they often go on upper or lower floors. And don’t forget the entryway to the home. If is always best if there is space for a ramp from the garage or a convenient exterior door. Even if you don’t need it, it is likely that some of your visitors may.

Convenient to activities

Another important aspect is convenience to various activities. Those activities are very different for different people but they often center around golf, fishing, church, or family. Sometimes the retirement community is built around these activities, sometime they are nearby. Consider how those retirement hours will be spent before your purchase.

Additionally if you want to increase your chances of having visitors consider moving to an area close to national attractions. This is one reason there are so many retirement communities near the Disney theme parks.

Easy to travel

One aspect that sometimes gets neglected when choosing a retirement community is access to easy travel. You don’t want to be isolated so consider how you will travel and how friends and family might travel to you.

Secure

One final aspect to consider is security. Ideally you want the ability to close your door and travel without worrying about having your home burglarized. Gated communities often help owners feel more secure. Having friends in the development who can check on your home is another option to consider.

 

 

Mesquite NV. Market Conditions

VIEW MARKET CONDITIONS


Market Conditions Summary for Mesquite, Nevada

Check your local neighborhood sales statistics for more detailed information.

National Summary (U.S.)
Pending Home Sales Rise in January to Highest Level in 18 Months

WASHINGTON (February 27, 2015) — Improved buyer demand at the beginning of 2015 pushed pending home sales in January to their highest level since August 2013, according to the National Association of REALTORS®. All major regions except for the Midwest saw gains in activity in January.

The Pending Home Sales Index,* a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, climbed 1.7 percent to 104.2 in January from an upwardly revised 102.5 in December and is now 8.4 percent above January 2014 (96.1). This marks the fifth consecutive month of year-over-year gains with each month accelerating the previous month’s gain.

Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says for the most part buyers in January were able to overcome tight supply to sign contracts at a pace that highlights the underlying demand that exists in today’s market. “Contract activity is convincingly up compared to a year ago despite comparable inventory levels,” he said. “The difference this year is the positive factors supporting stronger sales, such as slightly improving credit conditions, more jobs and slower price growth.”

Yun also points to more favorable conditions for traditional buyers entering the market. All-cash sales and sales to investors are both down from a year ago1, creating less competition and some relief for buyers who still face the challenge of limited homes available for sale.

“All indications point to modest sales gains as we head into the spring buying season,” says Yun. “However, the pace will greatly depend on how much upward pressure the impact of low inventory will have on home prices. Appreciation anywhere near double-digits isn’t healthy or sustainable in the current economic environment.”

The PHSI in the Northeast inched 0.1 percent to 84.9 in January, and is now 6.9 percent above a year ago. In the Midwest the index decreased 0.7 percent to 99.3 in January, but is 4.2 percent above January 2014.

Pending home sales experienced the largest increase in the South, up 3.2 percent to an index of 121.9 in January (highest since April 2010) and are 9.7 percent above last January. The index in the West rose 2.2 percent in January to 96.4 and is 11.4 percent above a year ago.

Total existing-homes sales in 2015 are forecast to be around 5.26 million, an increase of 6.4 percent from 2014. The national median existing-home price for all of this year is expected to increase near 5 percent. In 2014, existing-home sales declined 2.9 percent and prices rose 5.7 percent.

Check your local neighborhood sales statistics for more detailed information.

 

The National Association of REALTORS®, “The Voice for Real Estate,” is America’s largest trade association, representing 1 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.

Impotent information

Stroke has a new indicator

 

They say if you email this to ten people, you stand a chance of saving one life.

Will you send this along? Blood Clots / Stroke – They Now Have a Fourth Indicator, the Tongue

 

STROKE: Remember the 1st Three Letters…..

  1. T. R.

 

STROKE IDENTIFICATION:

 

 

During a BBQ, a woman stumbled and took a little fall – she assured everyone that she was fine (they offered to call paramedics) …she said she had just tripped over a brick because of her new shoes.

 

 

They got her cleaned up and got her a new plate of food. While she appeared a bit shaken up, Jane went about enjoying herself the rest of the evening.

 

 

Jane’s husband called later telling everyone that his wife had been taken to the hospital – (at 6:00 PM Jane passed away.) She had suffered a stroke at the BBQ. Had they known how to identify the signs of a stroke, perhaps Jane would be with us today. Some don’t die. They end up in a helpless, hopeless condition instead.

 

It only takes a minute to read this.

 

A neurologist says that if he can get to a stroke victim within 3 hours he can totally reverse the effects of a stroke…totally. He said the trick was getting a stroke recognized, diagnosed, and then getting the patient medically cared for within 3 hours, which is tough.

 

 

RECOGNIZING A STROKE

 

 

Thank God for the sense to remember the ‘3’ steps, STR. Read and

 

Learn!

 

 

Sometimes symptoms of a stroke are difficult to identify. Unfortunately, the lack of awareness spells disaster. The stroke victim may suffer severe brain damage when people nearby fail to recognize the symptoms of a stroke.

 

 

Now doctors say a bystander can recognize a stroke by asking three simple questions:

 

S *Ask the individual to SMILE.

 

T *Ask the person to TALK and SPEAK A

 

SIMPLE SENTENCE (Coherently)

 

(i.e. Chicken Soup)

 

R *Ask him or her to RAISE BOTH ARMS.

 

 

If he or she has trouble with ANY ONE of these tasks, call emergency number immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher.

 

New Sign of a Stroke

——–

Stick out Your Tongue!

 

 

NOTE: Another ‘sign’ of a stroke is this: Ask the person to ‘stick’ out his tongue. If the tongue is

‘crooked’, if it goes to one side or the other that is also an indication of a stroke.

 

 

A cardiologist says if everyone who gets this e-mail sends it to 10 people; you can bet that at least one life will be saved.

 

 

I have done my part. Will you?

 

Nevada to launch latest legal vice for tourists: Pot

Q&A: Nevada to launch latest legal vice for tourists: Pot

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Sin City will launch its latest legal vice by week’s end.

Lines are expected Saturday outside some medical marijuana dispensaries in Las Vegas and other Nevada cities that will begin selling pot for recreational use for the first time since voters approved it in November.

It’s the fastest turnaround from the ballot box to retail sales of any of the seven other states and the District of Columbia where pot is legal.

It comes after an ongoing legal battle over the drug’s distribution created uncertainty but ultimately won’t affect the kickoff.

Here’s a look at what’s expected this week:

___

WHAT WILL HAPPEN SATURDAY?

Anyone who is 21 with a valid ID can buy up to an ounce of pot, one-eighth of an ounce of edibles or concentrates. State regulators have notified at least 17 retail outlets that they have been approved for recreational sales and as many as 40 could be licensed by Saturday.

Some outlets plan grand opening events at 12:01 a.m., and one in Las Vegas is having a barbecue with raffle drawings. Nevada Dispensary Association President Andrew Jolley isn’t sure what kind of turnout to expect but said, “We are anticipating a lot of very happy customers.”

___

WHAT’S THE BIG DEAL?

Industry experts predict Nevada’s market will be the nation’s biggest, at least until California plans to begin recreational sales in January.

Nevada sales should eventually exceed those in Colorado, Oregon and Washington state because of the 45 million tourists who annually visit Las Vegas. Regulators anticipate 63 percent of customers will be tourists.

“I don’t think we’ve ever seen anything quite like what Nevada is going to look like just because of the sheer volume of tourism in the state,” said Nancy Whiteman, co-owner of the Colorado-based Wana Brands, which makes edible pot products.

However, it’s not clear how many people know pot is about to be legal. The law bans marijuana advertising on radio, TV or any other medium where 30 percent of the audience is reasonably expected to be younger than 21.

___

WHERE CAN I LIGHT UP?

It’s illegal in public places, including parks, sporting events, moving vehicles, casinos, hotels, concerts, festivals and while you’re walking down the street. So is drinking alcohol outdoors on the Las Vegas Strip, which generally isn’t enforced unless someone is causing trouble. It’s not clear yet if pot will be handled similarly.

People have been allowed to use marijuana in private homes since Jan. 1, but there has been nowhere to legally buy it without a medical card. Where you can buy recreational pot will change Saturday, but not where you can smoke it.

Using pot in public can get lead to a $600 ticket. It’s OK to smoke on the front porch of your home, but consumption is prohibited on U.S. property, from national forests to federally subsidized housing.

___

WHY DO HOTEL-CASINOS BAN POT?

They operate under federal licenses, and the U.S. government outlaws the drug. That means tourists will have a hard time finding a place to use it legally despite being the biggest expected piece of the market.

It’s one reason Whiteman and others think edibles will be most popular with tourists, who can eat the goodies almost anywhere without attracting attention, including casino floors where cigarettes are allowed but pot-smoking is not.

___

COULD THAT CHANGE?

Legislation to establish marijuana clubs and other places to smoke pot failed this spring but will be revisited by lawmakers in 2019. State Sen. Tick Segerblom, a leader of the legalization push, anticipates worldwide advertising urging tourists to “come to Nevada and smoke pot — so we must provide a place to do so.”

One Denver-based entrepreneur already has set up cannabis-friendly condos just off the Las Vegas Strip that allow pot smoking but not cigarettes. There’s also a “Cannabus” tour that offers riders a peek inside dispensaries, a grow facility and a swag bag filled with rolling papers and other gifts.

___

SHOULD BUYERS BEWARE?

The drug’s potency is much higher than stuff sold on the streets a couple of decades ago. Edibles are the biggest concern because the effects can sneak up on pot newbies, who may take too much without realizing they are slowly getting high.

All packaged edibles, from gummies to brownies, must carry labels warning that the intoxicating effects may be delayed for two hours or more and that users should initially eat a small amount.

___

WHAT ABOUT THE LEGAL BATTLE?

A court order has denied pot distribution licenses to anyone other than the alcohol industry, which the state intends to appeal. The ballot measure passed by voters says liquor wholesalers have the exclusive right to transport marijuana from growers to retailers, the only legal pot state with such an arrangement.

But existing dispensaries can sell their stockpiled inventory for recreational use until they run out, with most thinking they can last three weeks or longer. That means retail stores could have a supply shortage as August approaches.

By then, however, the state should have issued at least some distribution licenses to alcohol wholesalers.

“I get the sense that most, if not all, dispensaries will have sufficient inventory to serve retail customers until distributors are up and running,” Nevada Dispensary Association President Andrew Jolley said.

___

Associated Press Writer Regina Garcia Cano in Las Vegas contributed to this report.

Showing Your House

Showing Your House

From Chris Williams

Your house should always be available for show, even though it may occasionally be inconvenient for you. Let your listing agent put a lock box in a convenient place to make it easy for other agents to show your home to homebuyers. Otherwise, agents will have to schedule appointments, which is an inconvenience.  Most will just skip your home to show the house of someone else who is more cooperative.

Most agents will call and give you at least a couple of hours notice before showing your property. If you refuse to let them show it at that time, they will just skip your house. Even if they come back another time, it will probably be with different buyers and you may have just lost a chance to sell your home.

Try Not to be Home

Homebuyers will feel like intruders if you are home when they visit, and they might not be as receptive toward viewing your home. Visit the local coffee house, yogurt shop, or take the kids to the local park. If you absolutely cannot leave, try to remain in an out of they way area of the house and do not move from room to room. Do not volunteer any information, but answer any questions the agent may ask.

Lighting

When you know someone is coming by to tour your home, turn on all the indoor and outdoor lights – even during the day. At night, a lit house gives a “homey” impression when viewed from the street. During the daytime, turning on the lights prevents harsh shadows from sunlight and it brightens up any dim areas. Your house looks more homey and cheerful with the lights on.

Fragrances

Do not use scented sprays to prepare for visitors. It is too obvious and many people find the smells of those sprays offensive, not to mention that some may be allergic. If you want to have a pleasant aroma in your house, have a potpourri pot or something natural. Or turn on a stove burner (or the oven) for a moment and put a drop of vanilla extract on it. It will smell like you have been cooking.

Pet Control

If you have pets, make sure your listing agent puts a notice with your listing in the multiple listing service. The last thing you want is to have your pet running out the front door and getting lost. If you know someone is coming, it would be best to try to take the pets with you while the homebuyers tour your home. If you cannot do that, It is best to keep dogs in a penned area in the back yard. Try to keep indoor cats in a specific room when you expect visitors, and put a sign on the door. Most of the time, an indoor cat will hide when buyers come to view your property, but they may panic and try to escape.

The Kitchen Trash

Especially if your kitchen trash can does not have a lid, make sure you empty it every time someone comes to look at your home – even if your trash can is kept under the kitchen sink. Remember that you want to send a positive image about every aspect of your home. Kitchen trash does not send a positive message. You may go through more plastic bags than usual, but it will be worth it.

Keep the House Tidy

Not everyone makes his or her bed every day, but when selling a home it is recommended that you develop the habit. Pick up papers, do not leave empty glasses in the family room, keep everything freshly dusted and vacuumed. Try your best to have it look like a model home – a home with furniture but nobody really lives there.

 

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