Want a home that’s for sale by owner?

Want a home that's for sale by owner?

Want a home that’s for sale by owner?

Advertisements

4 Things to Put on Your Moving Checklist

4 Things to Put on Your Moving Checklist

Top 10 Threats to Real Estate in 2019

Top 10 Threats to Real Estate in 2019

June 14, 2018
storm cloud near roofline

Rising interest rates and the economy are the top two current issues to watch in real estate, according to the Counselors of Real Estate’s Top Ten Issues Affecting Real Estate 2018-2019, a list of the biggest threats to the housing market. For the first time, CRE broke its annual list down into current and longer-term issues to watch during the industry’s next year.

Top Current Issues to Watch

1. Interest rates and the economy: As interest rates rise, commercial and residential real estate markets are seeing several changes, such as decreasing demand for commercial property and higher home mortgage rates. Rate increases are making homes less affordable and are also limiting the value appreciation for commercial real estate. “Lack of wage growth for all but the wealthiest population segment is dampening housing demand, and limiting consumer spending that the economy needs for growth,” the report notes.

2. Politics and political uncertainty: Tax reform and policies aimed at balancing trade with other countries will have an impact on jobs, incomes, and both commercial and residential property, according to the report. “Congressional action to relax certain bank lending and asset management regulations was also among developing trends that may improve access to capital,” the report notes.

3. Housing affordability: The lack of affordable homes across income brackets, excluding the most wealthy, is being fueled by low wages, rising mortgage rates, and the underproduction of housing for nearly two decades, according to the report.

4. Generational change/demographics: Four distinct generations are exerting influence on commercial and residential real estate, such as in office design, student and elder housing, amenities, and location preferences.

5. E-commerce and logistics: Volatility in the retail sector, such as from the increase of e-commerce, is leading to a growth in warehouses.

Top Longer-Term Issues

1. Infrastructure: Roads, bridges, airports, water and sewer lines, electricity, and public transit are rapidly deteriorating, the report notes. An estimated $4.5 trillion is needed to improve critical infrastructure by 2025, according to the American Society of Civil Engineers. “The lack of serious effort by the U.S. to address its condition and much-needed revitalization leads the list of broader and emerging issues affecting real estate,” the report notes.

2. Disruptive technology: The report highlights advances in robotic manufacturing and warehousing; driverless cars and trucks; the extensive availability and utilization of personal and transactional data (aimed at enhancing business decisions); “smart” building technology that enables efficiency; global connectivity; automated business processes; and information protection through cybersecurity. “Nearly every aspect of real estate is undergoing dramatic change as these types of technology are adopted,” the report notes.

3. Natural disasters and climate change: The ongoing threat of natural disasters and climate change can result in high-priced property and environmental damage. This includes everything from severe storms, wildfires, and floods to earthquakes, volcanic activity, and rising sea levels.

4. Immigration: “If reduced by law, will have a negative impact on new housing starts and home purchases as well as worsen the current skilled labor shortage in the U.S.,” the report cautions.

5. Energy and water: Natural resources that are vital to property and quality of life are being threatened by environmental damage (manmade and from changing climates) as well as “entangling state and local regulations that are complicating development and lack the standardization that national regulations would provide.”

CRE additionally notes several other issues making its “watch list,” including rising construction costs; urbanization/suburbanization (with suburbs adapting citylike development and amenities); tax cuts (which may positively impact commercial properties; legislation is still developing); and societal leadership (social activism among younger Americans that is fueling business and social reform at many levels).

How To Channel Your Personality To Create The Perfect Home For You

How To Channel Your Personality To Create The

Perfect Home For You

How To Channel Your Personality To Create The Perfect Home For You

You’re not boring, and your home shouldn’t be either. But, you can obey all the design rules and end up with a place that looks like it came right out of a magazine but still lacks a little spark. Here’s how to inject a little “you” into it.

Art

You don’t have to have a house full of bold florals or abstract pieces just because that’s what’s “in” right now. But, it may feel like it if you’ve been browsing for art. Building an art collection with staying power means collecting items and styles you like now and that you will still like years from now – and that will keep your home feeling like it belongs to you, not to a gallery.

“Think beyond which artists are hot or trendy,” said Tze Chun, founder of Uprise Art, an online art gallery, to Corcoran. “The goal is to build a collection that can grow with you, so select artwork that speaks to you rather than what’s popular at the moment. Art is a great investment because of the value it provides you everyday, by improving your living space and offering daily inspiration.”

Furniture

It can be a little challenging to furnish a new space from scratch, especially if you don’t want a matchy-matchy situation. But, ordering a furniture “set” can be tempting because it makes it so easy to fill up a room quickly. Doing so can result in a boring look, and can also lock you into one particular style or color, which can be hard to break out of.


visaopanoramica.com
And then there’s another reality that many people face: Trying to merge too many pieces and too many styles into one cohesive arrangement that looks interesting, not haphazard. Using color to unify older and newer pieces is an easy trick to create a more pleasing space. For rooms that have too much new, or too much of the same style or color, adding in some pattern and/or texture can help break it up and make it more appealing.

Adding one great piece

Sometimes, all it takes it one great piece to create a memorable and mesmerizing space. Your grandmother’s old sideboard? Paint it glossy black and showcase it in your dining room juxtaposed against your modern table. That Italian chandelier you fell in love with at the Flea Market? Hang it over the bathtub in your master. Unexpected touches that speak to you will always catch your eye when you walk into the room, make you feel like you’re home, and become conversation pieces for visitors.

Personalized passions

No matter what you’re into, be it gothic architecture or prehistoric fossils, there is a way to bring that passion into your home and showcase it in a way that creates interest but also makes you smile.

“A collection is a window into someone’s world. Each piece tells a story of who they are and where they’ve been,” said Barron’s. Take a cue from three leading designers who offer recommendations for showcasing “cherished collections in style.”

Check your Zodiac sign

If you can diet according to your Zodiac sign, you can decorate according to it, too. The idea is to tap into the main elements of your sign to connect to the colors, styles, textures, and tastes that best suit you.

Aquarians “gravitate toward inventive design with nostalgic pops,” while Taurus’ “rooted earth sign” means they’re “drawn to natural, unpretentious materials like rustic wood and unpolished stone,” said PureWow. And the hermit like Cancer is “all about maintaining a soothing, domestic shell, which makes you the prime candidate for the Scandinavian lifestyle practice of hygge – aka the art of coziness.”

Choose color wisely

When you see a super chic home, it often has very little or no color on the walls. And the overwhelming mantra among designers, especially those who are staging a home, is to keep everything neutral. But you don’t have to follow that rule, especially if you’re just moving in or freshening up your place.


housebythewater.wordpress.com
“The introduction of colour into your home is the simplest and surest way to inject a little of your personality while creating a mood that is both interesting and enduring,” said Domain. “You would be surprised at how effectively combinations of colour can direct your mood. For instance, greens and blues are typically very calming which is why you will often see a hospital saturated with these tones, and red is a much more emotionally intense colour that is known to increase cravings for food, making it a common colour used in kitchens and dining rooms.”

If you’re not ready to do all the walls, start with one; you might end up loving this feature wall, or it may inspire you to go ahead and paint a few more.

Paper it

Wallpaper has been enjoying a resurgence over the past few years, and so has the peel-and-stick version. This is one of our favorites things to use to inject personality into a room and make it feel dynamic, romantic, exotic—or any other feeling you’re going for. Because it’s removable and replaceable, it’s great for fickle design folks (like us) who want peacocks on the wall this month, banana leaves the next (and then start thinking about how great that wall in the kitchen would look with peel-and-stick faux brick while we’re installing banana leaves in the living room).

 

 

 

WRITTEN BY JAYMI NACIRI

Elegantly Imperfect: The Wabi-Sabi Home

Elegantly Imperfect: The Wabi-Sabi Home

Elegantly Imperfect: The Wabi-Sabi Home

INVESTMENT PROPERTIES
Real Estate Investing: Secrets and Fraud

Real Estate Investing: Secrets and Fraud

Thanks to reality TV and celebrities who promise get-rich-quick solutions for a price, house flipping has become popular with would-be investors. But if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

 

Using Your IRA to Purchase a Home

Using Your IRA to Purchase a Home

The IRS allows limited, penalty-free IRA withdrawals for home purchases. But just because the option is available to you today doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the right choice for you long-term.

LUXURY MARKET
The Perfect Blue for You: 20 Pro Shades

The Perfect Blue for You: 20 Pro Shades

Designers love blue for its versatility. While one shade calms the senses, the next evokes the romance of Paris on a rainy day. Which is right for you? Here are 20 shades worth considering.

Adding a Home Bar? Advice From the Experts

Adding a Home Bar? Advice From the Experts

With the right design, a home bar can add a touch of personal style to your existing decor while creating a night-on-the-town vibe in the privacy of your own home. Here are a few inspirational ideas.

VACATION HOMES
14 Ways to Add Gold Finishes to Your Decor

14 Ways to Add Gold Finishes to Your Decor

With metallics currently trending, there’s never been a better time to incorporate gold accents throughout your home. Here are 14 ways you can add the Midas touch to every room.

Bathroom Tile: What's Trending in 2018?

Bathroom Tile: What’s Trending in 2018?

Your choice of tile can make or break your bathroom aesthetic, and the results are something you’ll have to live with for years to come. Before you decide, check out this year’s top six tiling trends.

Six Surprising Retirement Trends You Need To Know

Six Surprising Retirement Trends You Need To Know

Six Surprising Retirement Trends You Need To Know

Tiny homes. Rockin’ communities where Jimmy Buffet is your spirit animal. Rockin’ a strenuous hike minutes from home. Yeah, this is not your Grandfather’s retirement.

Long gone are the days when people packed it in and moved to a nice, calm little home for the aging in Florida the day they turn 65. Not only are people working longer today, but they are looking for more out of their retirement – more fun and excitement, more job opportunities, and more opportunity to hang out with family. If you’re getting ready to retire, these are the trends you’ll want to know about.

Lifestyle-oriented communities

And we’re not just talking about weekly bingo. There is a wave of new retirement communities, most notably Jimmy Buffet’s foray into a new career path, that cater to a much more active lifestyle. “It’s easy to chuckle at news that a Margaritaville retirement community is coming to Florida (what better age for Parrotheads to pursue their day-drinking dreams?),” said Curbed. “But the billion-dollar community offers more of what today’s and tomorrow’s seniors really want: active, engaging, and walkable neighborhoods. Latitude Margaritaville Daytona Beach has nine models open, with new homes priced from the $200,000s; the Hilton Head, SC location is in its first phase with prices from the mid $200,000s.”

Other developments, like the new $100 million-plus Rancho Mission Viejo in Orange County, CA is being developed “as an upscale mixed-generation development, with housing catering to older adults integrated into clusters of neighborhoods,” they said. “Developments like New York’s new community center for the Morningside Retirement & Health Services (MRHS) showcase a renewed focus on active, communal space. A cohousing development for seniors on Oakland’s waterfront called Phoenix Commons has been compared to a ‘dorm for grownups.'”

Retiring…but not all the way

Mid-size and larger cities are becoming havens for retirees because, among other positive attributes, they offer thriving job markets. So why would that be important to someone who is getting ready to stop working? Because, increasingly, retirees aren’t retiring all the way. Or, they’re embarking on secondary careers, often part-time, post retirement. “74% of working Americans plan to work past retirement age, with 11% expecting to work full time and 63% expecting to work part-time,” said The Street.

 

Multi-generational living

Multi-generational living is on one of real estate’s fastest-growing trend. “In 1940, about one-quarter of the U.S. population lived with three or more generations in one home. After WWII, American families largely became two-generational, with parents and minor-age children under one roof,” said Forbes. “The percentage of households with multiple generations started declining to 21%, reaching a low of 12% by 1980.” According to Pew Research Center data, 60.6 million people, or 19 percent of the U.S. population, lived in multigenerational homes, including 26.9 million three-generation households.”

In fact, the trend is so pervasive today that builders are increasingly creating highly livable granny flats and tiny homes that can live on family land or in backyards. They’re also building new construction homes like Lennar’s Next Gen, which is billed as a “home within a home” and includes “all the features you’d expect in a separate unit (a kitchenette, single car garage and full bathroom) while giving you the freedom to pop in whenever you’d like,” they said.

Increasing the activity level

“The choice of recreational activities is gradually shifting as the baby boomer generation heads into retirement,” said U.S. News & World Report. “A recent study by the Physical Activity Council revealed some interesting findings. Activities that are increasing in popularity include camping, bicycling, hiking and canoeing. Activities that are decreasing in popularity include golf, swimming for fitness and working out using machines or weights.”

The AARP found that boomers are increasingly migrating to states “with mild climates and recreational options. “A newly released survey indicates that those who do move increasingly choose mountain and western states where they find a desirable combination of affordable housing, mild weather and outdoor recreational opportunities, such as skiing and hiking,” they said. United Van Lines’ National Movers Study found that the Mountain West region – which stretches from Arizona to Wyoming – attracted the “biggest influx of older people, with 24.5 percent of those moving citing retirement as a reason for relocating.” That represents a strong shift from several decades ago “when older people mostly left northern states and headed southward. ‘We’re seeing retirees being attracted to more outdoor adventure destinations than in the past.”

Following family

Another of today’s top trends has retirees moving closer to family. For many grandparents, moving toward their children and grandchildren is “the last chance to focus on family and to leave a legacy of special memories,” says Christine Crosby, editorial director of Grandmagazine,” to Kiplinger.

 

 

 

 

WRITTEN BY JAYMI NACIRI

Home Seller Tips To Having A Successful Open House

Home Seller Tips To Having A Successful Open House

Home Seller Tips To Having A Successful Open House

Holding an open house for your soon-to-be-listed or newly on the market home is a lot like being on a game show where edging out the other contestants in a short period of time is key. In TV game shows, such as “Jeopardy,” the contestants don’t automatically know answers to so many trivia questions; they study and they plan and they make it appear to viewers like they walk around with that body of knowledge every day. Open houses need to be thought of similarly. Once your home is on the market, an open house is your opportunity to plan and strategize how you are going to win over buyers in very short time.

Even in a strong real estate market where houses sell quickly, it’s still important to ask your agent to hold as many open houses as possible until the home sells. One reason is that even buyers with agents still like to look at homes on their own without feeling the pressure of a home tour. Sometimes their agent is out of town when your house goes on the market. Many buyers are not represented by an agent and the only way for them to tour a home is through an open house. Your agent will plan the open house to include everything from signage to freshly baked cookies. As a seller, you should take the following steps:

Depersonalize

Back to the game show analogy, think of depersonalizing as studying the answers and questions before trying out for “Jeopardy.” Your house is lovely for how you live in it, but buyers don’t want to see you in your house. In fact, the more your house makes it difficult to guess who lives there (age, religion, gender etc), the better. Take down personal photos, religious emblems, the cute collection of mini ceramic frogs, etc. Analyze your stuff for whether it’s morally, politically, or otherwise socially objectionable and remove all of it. You don’t want to eliminate buyers because they are turned off by your personal tastes.

Declutter

While you are depersonalizing it’s also a good time to declutter as the two go hand in hand. The more simple and understated your home is, the more likely buyers can see the home for what it is and imagine themselves in it. When you have too much stuff cluttering walls and counters and shelves, buyers turn their focus toward those things and sometimes even make the assumption in logic that if you are cluttery, then you are disorganized, which means maybe you don’t take care of the house as well or as on time as you should. A good rule of thumb is to box up or store at least half of the smaller items displayed in your home.

For example, how much is on your kitchen counter right now? Now imagine reducing that number to just three things. What would you choose to keep versus store? Some sellers are benefited by going to other open houses in their area and looking at how other people have decluttered and arranged what is left. Online pictures, such as what is found on Pinterest, can help too. Often you can get some good ideas on what works visually just by seeing how others do it. When you are all done decluttering, clean your home like never before because buyers notice dirt and grime. Hire a maid service if you have to.

Lure Them In

The outside of your home is as important as the inside, especially the front entry area. Before an open house, take care of simple yard maintenance such as mowing, edging and weeding flower beds. A fresh layer of mulch adds color especially in winter months when not much is blooming. At your front door, clean off spider webs, blown leaves, and place a large, colorful pot of annuals or anything you can buy in season.

Complete Your Honey-Do List

While you have the yard power tools out, dust of your workbench and take a walk around your house inside and out. Make a list of all maintenance issues such as wiggly door handles, missing fascia, paint that has chipped, etc. and repair them before the open house. Buyers see even the smallest of maintenance issues as an extension of the condition of larger items such as roofs, plumbing and major appliances and assume you haven’t taken care of the home. You might talk to your realtor about a pre-inspection to deal with all home maintenance and problems upfront, before you get into contract with a buyer.

Be Cautious

Once you have taken the above steps and you are ready for the actual open house, there’s one last thing to plan. Protecting your valuables and identity. It might be rare, but criminals do use open houses as a way to case a house or to find collateral to steal identities. Make sure indoor safes are locked and hidden. Store heirlooms, checkbooks, prescriptions, and valuable jewelry away from prying eyes. Utilize a reliable, trustworthy, identity theft protection service to see you through the entire listing and sales process.